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What does “like an elephant's eye” mean from "We seldom ever have an argument, but if it is, it's about something like an elephant's eye"? The sentence is from an interview, an old couple talks about their relationship. I googled, but can't find the meaning.

Thank you! :)

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    It's about something like a potato's eye or a tornado's eye. "Like an elephant's eye" is not an idiom. "Like", in this case, isn't being used to suggest a simile, but rather simply means "similar to". The main implication is that it's about something that's unimportant and that the arguer knows very little about -- something not worth arguing about. – Hot Licks Jan 6 '19 at 13:32
  • @lbf I don't think "as high as an elephant's eye" is as same as "like an elephant's eye". – Xiangwei Chen Jan 6 '19 at 13:53
  • @Hot Licks Thank you! But I still can't understand the connection between "an elephant's eye" and "unimportant ". – Xiangwei Chen Jan 6 '19 at 13:56
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    "We seldom ever have an argument, but if it is, it's about something like an elephant's eye" - This sentence is not written by a native speaker. We would not say, "if it is", we would say "if we do". Where did you find this sentence? (Note that "seldom ever" is also incorrect although some less well-educated natives might say it) – chasly - reinstate Monica Jan 6 '19 at 14:44
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This is an example of the use of a nonsence word.

"We seldom ever have an argument, but if it is, it's about something like an elephant's eye."

nonsense words TFD

words are used in literature for poetic or humorous effect. Proper names of real or fictional entities are sometimes nonsense words.

The sentence could have been written:

"We seldom ever have an argument, but if we do, it's about the weather on mars!"

meaning

"Our arguments were rare and were about nothing of significance."

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