3

"Use the installation wizard to choose between either a and b, or to install both of them simultaneously." or is it "Use the installation wizard to choose between either a or b, or to install both of them simultaneously."

Also, is there a comma before the second or, am I omitting any other comma(s), is it grammatically correct to have such a structure even, should I restructure it ;0

  • Yes, you should restructure it. Even just changing the formatting (visual layout) can help. – Lawrence Jan 3 at 11:48
  • Thank you Lawrence! Do you think it works like that: 'Use the installation wizard to choose between a, b, or their simultaneous installation.' – Zheni Metodieva Jan 3 at 11:54
  • Re-reading your question, I'm now unsure what difference you're drawing between "a and b" and "both of them". – Lawrence Jan 3 at 11:56
  • 1
    If you actually have 3 options, just say "a, b, or both". Or even "a or b or both". – Lawrence Jan 3 at 11:57
  • 3
    If you use the word between, then and is used. You choose between one thing and another. If you remove between, then you use or. You choose one thing or another. – Jason Bassford Jan 3 at 13:20
1

"Choose either A and B, or C" means, in general, two choices:

  • A and B
  • C

"Choose either A or B, or C" means, in general, three choices:

  • A
  • B
  • C

If "C" is equivalent to "A and B",
"Choose either A and B, or C" gives no choice at all: it always means "A and B".
"Choose either A or B, or C" in this case means three choices:

  • A
  • B
  • A and B

And, in any case, the word "between" is superfluous in this construction.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.