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"Just forget the egg for a minute, all right?" Harry hissed as Professor Flitwick went whizzing resignedly past them, landing on top of a large cabinet?

Are the three verbs hissed, whizzing, and landing? Is whizzing a gerund? I am kind of confused here.

  • Learning grammar inside my SAT book and trying to find examples in Harry Potter. – austingae Dec 28 '18 at 22:30
  • You could easily have 20 verbs in a (moderately contorted) sentence. – Hot Licks Dec 28 '18 at 22:43
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"Hissed", "went", "whizzing", and "landing" are all verbs in the quoted sentence. They are inflected forms of the verbs hiss, go, whiz and land. The quote within the quote contains the verb "forget".

The words "whizzing" and "landing" in this context would typically not be categorized as "gerunds". The exact definition of the term "gerund" (and whether it is a clearly defined concept at all) is actually disputed, but in general, a gerund is thought of as a verb with the suffix -ing that "acts like a noun" (for example, by being the head of a phrase or clause that is used as a subject, or as the object of a preposition). In "Professor Flitwick went whizzing resignedly past them, landing on top of a large cabinet", the words "whizzing" and "landing" don't have any "noun-like" function. They would be classified as -ing-participles (which are variously called "present participles", "progressive participles", or "continuous participles"; or "gerund-participles" if the gerund/participle distinction is rejected).

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I did a very quick google search:

Hissed

Hissed

Whizzing

Whizzing

Landing

Landing

Although in this case they say it is a noun, landing can be a verb.

Example:

I was flying. Then I landed my plane on an airfield.

As you can see, landed is a verb in this case, as you are doing an action to do something to the plane. In the google search, it is a noun, because they are saying that they made a perfect landing, not that they landed the plane.

In your sentences, all three are verbs. They are an action. I hope it makes sense!

  • For the example for landing, is that what we call gerund? – austingae Dec 28 '18 at 22:20
  • "Landing", in the OP's quote, is not a noun. – Hot Licks Dec 28 '18 at 22:44
  • @HotLicks I understand the confusion. I never confirmed that it was. I will edit my answer. – Sweet_Cherry Dec 28 '18 at 22:47
  • You just said "landing" is not a verb??? – Hot Licks Dec 28 '18 at 22:49
  • Oop sorry I got confused about landing because of the google thing. – Sweet_Cherry Dec 28 '18 at 22:53

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