0

I came across the following sentence posted at the city of Melbourne public transportation rules, referring to the duties of the transportation officers:

They can check your ticket and concession entitlement, even after you’ve left the vehicle or station.

Why the verb in the dependent clause (following even after) is in Present Perfect? Would this sentence be grammatically incorrect or possibly have a different meaning when Present Simple were to be used instead, i.e.

They can check your ticket and concession entitlement, even after you leave the vehicle or station

?

0

You are partially right.

Using the Present Simple Tense is quite correct because there's a special lexical indication of precedence ('even after').

But the Present Perfect Tense is preferable (though optional) here because the Perfect verb form makes the whole sentence stronger, more emphatic.

Compare your example with the sentence where the Present Perfect Tense is obligatory:

They can check your ticket and concession entitlement, when you have left the vehicle or station.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.