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The noise was like an English fox-hunt only better because every now and then with the music of the hounds was mixed the roar of the other lion and sometimes the far deeper and more awful roar of Aslan himself.

should the clause have been ”because every now and then the roar of the other lion and sometimes the far deeper and more awful roar of Aslan himself was mixed with the music of the hounds.”?

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    What do you mean, “should have been”? Are you alleging that what CS Lewis wrote was somehow ungrammatical? – tchrist Dec 20 '18 at 5:41
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    Of course, yes, there is an inversion. But it need not have been otherwise. The inversion is acceptable, and is quite normal usage. "with the music of the hounds was mixed" before its subject is equivalent to "was mixed with the music" after it. HTH. – Kris Dec 20 '18 at 6:34
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    C.S. Lewis is using inversion to make his writing clearer. The phrase "the music of the hounds" is naturally associated with "an English fox-hunt", and the inversion puts these two phrases close to each other so as to highlight their association. This is a better order than the standard subject-verb-object would have been. – Peter Shor Dec 20 '18 at 9:07
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    Why would anyone doubt the impeccable grammar of someone like C.S. Lewis? – BillJ Dec 20 '18 at 10:24
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    @tchrist absolutely not,i like what he wrote very as much as you do.i was just wondering if there is an inversion and trying to make my question clear thereby showing the order i had been thinking about. – user328878 Dec 20 '18 at 11:43
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This type of inversion is grammatical.

In a comment, Peter Shor wrote:

C.S. Lewis is using inversion to make his writing clearer. The phrase "the music of the hounds" is naturally associated with "an English fox-hunt", and the inversion puts these two phrases close to each other so as to highlight their association. This is a better order than the standard subject-verb-object would have been.

  • If it weren't grammatical, would it be "inversion"? If it were indeed an "inversion," why would it be anything but grammatical? Copy of a comment by another member makes for an answer? In the name of the community? – Kris Dec 21 '18 at 6:26

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