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Can someone tell me if the use of two consecutive "whether" clauses (like the sentence below) is correct? It sounds odd to my ears.

"Whether you're big or small, whether you're rich or poor, I offer a comprehensive solution that helps you succeed."

I also tried the sentence below, but it sounds too "or"-y.

"Whether you're big or small, or rich or poor, I offer a comprehensive solution that helps you succeed."

I also tried the sentence below, but it sounds odd too.

"Whether you're big or small, rich or poor, I offer a comprehensive solution that helps you succeed."

Ideally, I'd like a single sentence, but I'm not sure how to go about it.

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  • The third one seems most natural to me – Tim Foster Dec 14 '18 at 11:39
  • @TimFoster, thanks. It sounds a bit 'staccato' to me, but I'm more concerned with correctness. Independent of sound, do you have any input on which (if any) of these is grammatically correct? Or perhaps an alternative phrasing? – Razzzzz Dec 14 '18 at 12:38
  • Strictly speaking, I'd say there's a problem with all of them. (Using parentheses or dashes would be more strictly appropriate.) However, in practical terms, there is nothing wrong with any of them. Many writers will do things not exactly grammatically correct for the sake of style—and it's perfectly fine. Note that, technically, it's quite correct to say whether you're big or small or rich or poor. There is no reason that you have to use commas at all. Most people would easily understand the two sets of paired ideas. – Jason Bassford Dec 15 '18 at 4:21
  • @JasonBassford - Thanks for the input. In general, I'm ok with bending the rules, so long as I am understood. I guess what I'm after is this: If there are ways to make it (strictly speaking) "correct", I'd like to know what those are so I can make a conscious decision to follow or bend the "rules". You mentioned used parentheses or dashes as an alternative. Any way you can provide an example? – Razzzzz Dec 15 '18 at 10:19
  • The third one is definitely the crispest, cleanest and most polished. – Lordology Dec 15 '18 at 21:34
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All answers are valid, but the third reduces redundancy and makes the sentence more concise than the others. (The second "whether you're..." is implied.)

An alternative formulation might be:

I can offer a comprehensive solution to help you succeed, be it big or small.

I have difficulty understanding what is supposed to be big, small,rich or poor. The customer, the problem or something else?

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