0

I want to know if this sentence is grammatically correct. 'the students have begun their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered the class'

I am confused with have begun and had began

  • Hi Obed, you may not be aware that our other site English Language Learners is the best place to look for answers on English questions that a fluent speaker would find trivial. If you have a question for ELL, be sure to read their guidance on what you can ask. :-) – Chappo Dec 12 '18 at 9:35
1

It's 'had'.

The students had begun their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered.

'Had' is used because the sentence only makes sense in the past tense.

'Have', which is present tense, would only work like this: The students have begun their usual morning devotion. The teacher enters the room.

0

"The students had begun their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered the class" Because we know that if the verb is past indefinite after the word when the previous verb of the word when will be past perfect. So. The answer will ne had begun. ☺☺☺☺

  • So when is had began used? – Obed Asante Dec 12 '18 at 9:26
  • 1
    @ObedAsante had began is never used. It's had begun. – Chappo Dec 12 '18 at 9:37
1

I would say: ''The students began their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered the class". The sentence informs about the events which happened in the correct sequence. When the chronology of events isn't broken or reverse, the Past Perfect Tense is optional.

  • Your final sentence is probably wrong (it doesn't quite make sense, so I can't say it's definitely wrong). Past perfect isn't "optional", it's used for a specific reason. Compare your sentence with this one using the past perfect: ''The students had already begun their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered the class." This also shows a chronological sequence, but it's different from the first one. – Chappo Dec 13 '18 at 2:26
  • If we want to underline the fact that the first event happened BEFORE the other one, we CAN use the Past Perfect Tense and 'already'. The term 'optional' is used for the lack of necessity to use the Past Perfect Tense when the order of events in the sentence doesn't contradict their chronology. – user307254 Dec 13 '18 at 4:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.