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I know of at least one language (German, although it’s considered old-fashioned nowadays) where it’s possible to combine demonstrative and possessive pronoun:

Diese deine Worte sind wahr.

These your words are true.

I’ve never seen a construct like this in English. Is it even possible?

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    It's old-fashioned in English, too, but it has occurred. Normally two determiners like these and thy (which is common in the construction; that gives you some idea of the age depth) can't go together, but These thy words are true could be Early Modern English. – John Lawler Dec 10 '18 at 3:07
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    Which is why we transpose "your words" into "words of yours" -- but the structure itself has nothing wrong in it. – Kris Dec 10 '18 at 8:18
  • Go in this thy might, and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites Judges 6:14 (KJV) – Nigel J Dec 10 '18 at 14:10
  • All good answers. One of you should provide the above in an answer so that @dulange can accept it and get some points. :-) – MikeJRamsey56 Dec 10 '18 at 16:50
  • Since they won't, I will. – Lordology Dec 14 '18 at 10:20
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Go in this thy might, and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites

Judges 6:14 (King James Bible)

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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

It's old-fashioned in English, too, but it has occurred. Normally two determiners like these and thy (which is common in the construction; that gives you some idea of the age depth) can't go together, but These thy words are true could be Early Modern English.

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