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"The accident happened on 1st April causing many casualties." or "The accident that happened on 1st April caused many casualties."

  • I was just wondering if the modifier in the sentence could be in an ing-form, if not how can explain why not?
  • In the US at least, it’d be more common to say, “happened on the first of April...” or “happened on April 1st” or in more business lingo “happened on 1-April” – Jim Jan 7 at 2:40
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Both are grammatically correct.  What counts as a modifier changes. 

 

The accident happened on 1st April, causing many casualties. 

Here, the finite verb "happened" forms a clause with "the accident" as its subject.  The participial phrase "causing many accidents" is a supplemental modifier, further describing the content of the entire clause. 

 

The accident that happened on 1st April caused many casualties. 

Here, the finite verb "happened" forms a clause with "that" as its subject.  The restrictive relative clause "that happened on 1st April" further describes the noun phrase "the accident".  The finite verb "caused" forms a matrix clause, with the entire phrase "the accident that happened on 1st April" as its subject. 

  • The comma is important, 1st of April doesn't usually cause casualties :) Strickly speaking though, "on 1st April" cannot take a participle, and "on" can't take a "participative noun", if that's what that is called. – vectory Jan 7 at 3:17

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