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This question already has an answer here:

I'm confused in whether to write know or knows in the following statement:- "The ones who are included know better."?

Also explain the difference between the two, thanks.

marked as duplicate by Ahmed, FumbleFingers, Hot Licks, Scott, J. Taylor Dec 2 '18 at 2:20

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  • You may not be aware that our other site English Language Learners is the best place to look for answers on English questions that a fluent speaker would find trivial. To understand which site you should use, read this discussion on Meta. If you have a question for ELL, be sure to read their guidance on what you can ask. :-) – Chappo Dec 1 '18 at 23:18
  • FWIW: there are two rules at work here: (1) for regular verbs, only the third person singular takes the -s form (e.g. he knows); (2) the verb number must agree with the subject number. Since the subject here ("ones") is plural, we use third person plural: "[they] know". – Chappo Dec 1 '18 at 23:23
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As this is very basic, I think you should've just googled it. But here's the answer:

It is the same as any other verb, we put an 's' at the end when we're talking about a singular noun, e.g. drink: He drinks coffee every morning; They drink too much when they get together on weekends.

Therefore, since 'ones' is plural, we use know: "The ones who are included know better".

Hope this helps.

  • More precisely, it's the 3rd person singular subject that takes that form of the verb -- I know, you know, he knows. – Hot Licks Dec 1 '18 at 18:01
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You can exactly say:

The ones who are included know better."

because "ones" is plural, which suggests more than one individuals.

If you think that you should use "know" then you have to start the given sentence as "the one ..." because "one" is singular, after which "knows" is acceptable, such as:

The one who is included knows better."

  • You can kind of view it as conservation of s characters. – Hot Licks Dec 1 '18 at 18:01

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