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I have these words : Public hospitals - Pharmacy store - Doctors clinic - Gym club training & gym supplements store - Makeup artist room & store.

Is there a common word for : store-clinic-club-hospital?

Example: (Apple-Banana-Mango)= fruits

  • There are many common words and phrases that could be used: buildings, businesses, public places, service centres, indoors, properties. (But makeup artist room seems oddly out of place.) It depends on what you're trying to express. What common theme do you see them as having? – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Dec 1 '18 at 7:23
  • @JasonBassford,Actually I'm working on Web project,each user has dedicated place.For example :Doctor has a clinic or work on hospital.Pharmacist has medication store.Gym coach has training club or supplements store.So we have many users but each user has its own service center.I guess "service center" is the common word that serves my theme. – Menai Ala Eddine Dec 1 '18 at 7:33
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    An answer (below) is 'workspace'. I'm not sure if it is an AmE/BrE situation but as a BrE speaker, I would use 'workplace' Merriam Webster. – Nigel J Dec 1 '18 at 23:31
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It wasn't clear from the question what common theme existed between the various words. A comment under the question clarified this:

I'm working on Web project,each user has dedicated place.For example :Doctor has a clinic or work on hospital.Pharmacist has medication store.Gym coach has training club or supplements store.

I had suggested a few example questions, and service centre was picked as the closest to this.

However, service centre seems like a poor choice to me, at least idiomatically, because it has an specific association with car repair (or other types of repair), and it wouldn't apply to the example in the question of a makeup artist room. But it helped narrow down the context of the question.

A word that is more appropriate for the same theme is workspace.

[Oxford Dictionaries]

1 Space in which to work.
1.1 An area rented or sold for commercial purposes.

‘The building will provide individual workspaces to accommodate start up enterprises in the food and technology industries.’

‘A five-year plan will transform the historic building into flats, shops and workspaces.’

‘Ironically, the higher rents of many downtown workspaces are the result of artists reclaiming the otherwise empty buildings.’

'‘Since its founding in 1997 as a workspace and gallery, the Space, as it's called, has helped nurture careers for just about every artist affiliated with it.’

This can apply to entire buildings, a single room, or even a rented chair at a hair dresser's.

However, it seems this is a word more commonly used in British English than American English. (As a Canadian, I had not been aware of this particular word's regionalism. It seems it's one we get from the UK but don't consider as coming from any particular place.)

Normally, I would have provided a definition from Merriam-Webster, but it doesn't have an entry for it. Of course, the use of work space as two words is also quite acceptable. There is the generic phrase place of work, but it doesn't have the same specific meaning as workspace—something that can be used for something as specific as a rented hairdresser's chair.

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