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I'm writing an introduction part for my research paper. I wrote a sentence that follows:

"The main concern of this study is to find out whether there is a relationship between gender and success and interest for different disciplines taught in the FLE department of METU"

In the sentence, I want to mean "gender" as being one part and "success and interest" being the other part. If I use two ands like this, it creates an ambiguity. How can I rewrite this?

  • I don't like using between for more than two items, so I'd render that as are relationships among gender, success and interest. Just my two cents. – Jim Mack Nov 26 '18 at 17:28
  • @JimMack - OP has stated there are two Items: 1. gender and 2. success and interest – Jim Nov 26 '18 at 18:11
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    … between on the one hand gender, and on the other success and interest. Not exactly pretty, but unambiguous. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Nov 26 '18 at 20:49
  • @Jim - Yikes, I drove right by that one... – Jim Mack Nov 27 '18 at 19:34
  • @JanusBahsJacquet, your comment is the only viable answer to this question; why not post it as such? I know that short simple answers are generally disdained on this site, but, as long as the question is not deleted, isn't it better that it be answered correctly, rather than left unanswered, or answered incorrectly? – jsw29 Dec 26 '18 at 18:55
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I would handle it like a list:

"The main concern of this study is to find out whether there is a relationship between gender, success, and interest(s?) for different disciplines taught in the FLE department of METU"

Also, the terms "success" and, especially, "interest(s?)" seem ambiguous or unclear. There might be more specific phrasing you could use, depending on the context.

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    OP has stated there are two Items: 1. gender and 2. success and interest – Jim Nov 26 '18 at 18:13
  • good point. deleting :) – Carly Nov 26 '18 at 18:15

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