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I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Michigan because my grandparents live there. By today’s standards, they have very heavy accents, with full Canadian raising and the northern cities vowel shift. They also say ben for been. I understand the first four features but the feature that always perplexed me was that words with a short I sound would become an ee-I sound, similar to how the southerners say pin. So English would become englee-ish to them. This is not the pen-pin merger because they say pen and men with the normal short e sound. Is there a name for this phenomenon and if there is, how did it come about?

  • Do you mean their KIT is raised and diphthongized, or just raised? – Nardog Nov 23 '18 at 20:39
  • Both, similar to how southerners would pronounce pin, but the short e sound was not merged with this sound like the southerners do. It would also never be a first syllable sound that changes to this sound. – Polubios Nov 24 '18 at 3:11
  • @Nardog Both, similar to how southerners would pronounce pin, but the short e sound was not merged with this sound like the southerners do. It would also never be a first syllable sound that changes to this sound. You’ll here a faster spoken version of what i’m Talking about in this video, notice how he says “conservative”. m.youtube.com/watch?v=d_SN9urD5KU – Polubios Nov 24 '18 at 3:30

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