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I'm not a native English speaker. I'd like to ask a question about the usage of "benefit" in its verb form.

For example, "The device comprises A, B and C. It benefits to be light and thin."

The usage of benefit like this...Is it sounds weird or wrong on it's grammar??

Because I think "benefit" in it's intransitive form means "derive sth good from", the usage like this may be grammatically wrong?

It would be appreciated if someone could answer this question <(_ _)>

  • You could say "it benefits from being light and thin", that sounds more natural to me. I can't really explain the grammatical rule however. – samgak Nov 20 '18 at 3:59
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"The device comprises A, B and C. It benefits to be light and thin."

I would change to :

The device is comprised of A, B, and C. This benefits the device, as it remains light and thin.

  • Or even just "This has the benefit of making it light and thin" – user323578 Apr 19 at 10:05

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