The sentence is, "I want to leverage my understanding of topic A with the knowledge of topic B to prepare myself well for a particular career".

I want to convey that I already know topic A and learning topic B will be a huge add-on if I want to choose a particular career.

Can you suggest me a better way of conveying the idea ?

I think you would be better off using leverage as a noun. Most dictionaries define it first as a noun (Merriam-Webster, American Heritage, Cambridge, etc.), and only second as a verb (and dubiously at that - AH and MW both define the verb form as "to provide something with leverage").

There also appears to be a raging internet argument around the use of "leverage" as a verb (and its general overuse). You can see related discussions at Pain in the English and Fluent (prepare yourself for the latter - the title of the article is "Are You Stupid Enough to Use Leverage as a Verb?").

A better construction of your sentence would be something like the following:

Supplementing your understanding of topic A with knowledge of topic B could give you leverage over other applicants for a job in a particular career field.

Here's a specific example off the top of my head:

Supplementing your proficiency in Adobe Illustrator with knowledge of basic graphic design principles would give you leverage over other applicants for the Magazine Editor position.

  • Thanks for the suggestion Bryan! 'Supplement' seems the right word. – ktgrhsd Nov 12 at 22:35
  • How does this sound to you ? By reinforcing my existing understanding of topic A with that of topic B, I hope to better prepare myself for a particular career. – ktgrhsd Nov 12 at 22:46
  • It sounds pretty good, but I think you want to add "knowledge of" before topic B, i.e., "By reinforcing my existing understanding of topic A with knowledge of topic B, I hope to better prepare myself for a particular career." With your current construction, the "that of topic B" is actually saying "existing understanding of topic B." (Edit: still learning how to comment!) – Bryan Pettit Nov 12 at 22:51
  • In my case topic A and B are completely independent of each other, but they somehow help in improving a particular career path. I am just afraid that the word 'reinforce' will indicate the topics A and B are complementary to one another, which they are not. – ktgrhsd Nov 12 at 23:05
  • Hmm... are you 'reinforcing' both topics A and B, or ? Saying that you're reinforcing your existing understanding with that of topic B implies that the two are connected; i.e., a better understanding of topic B reinforces, or makes stronger, your understanding of topic A (which probably won't happen if both A and B are independent of one another). Perhaps "By reinforcing my existing understanding of topic A and topic B, I hope to better prepare myself for a particular career." would be more accurate? – Bryan Pettit Nov 12 at 23:31

"I want to leverage my understanding of topic A with the knowledge of topic B to prepare myself well for a particular career".

to leverage, verb [ T ] (USE) ​

to use something that you already have in order to achieve something new or better; to improve or enhance:

My sense is that your use of leverage as in your sample sentence is grammatical and appropriate. To enhance would do nicely too.

enhance:

make better or more attractive, to increase

  • Your citation implies that 'leverage' is used for help something with something you already have. The OP is just adding on topic B. – Mitch Nov 12 at 23:45
  • @Mitch The knowledge of X help the understanding of Y. Does not having X leverage the learning Y? – lbf Nov 12 at 23:49
  • "I want to leverage my understanding of tires with the knowledge of engines to better prepare myself for a career as a car mechanic", I don't think I am using leverage correctly here. How do I say that I already know an important part of a system and want to learn about another part, thus I want to make myself a better mechanic. – ktgrhsd Nov 13 at 6:37
  • "I want to leverage my understanding of Latin to gain knowledge of Medicine to prepare myself well for as a nurse practitioner particular ". – lbf Nov 13 at 13:07

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