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Year to date (YTD) is commonly used to describe the completed portion of the current calendar year. Is there a common term to use for the remaining part of the year (i.e. - now through December 31 of the current year)?

The idea is to use this in a graph with a fixed x-axis showing the entire year. Obviously, I could truncate the graph to the current date. However, the use case (out of my control) calls for showing all the dates of the year and adding a label to the unfinished portion of the year.

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    The rest of the year. The remainder of the year... What’s left of the year... – Jim Nov 8 '18 at 18:45
  • Year to come ?? – k1eran Nov 8 '18 at 22:36
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    What is the context where you'll be using it? YTD is often used in reporting statistics, and you can't generally report similar statistics for the future. – Barmar Nov 12 '18 at 19:35
  • @Barmar The idea is to use this in a graph with a fixed x-axis showing the entire year. Obviously, I could truncate the graph to the current date. However, the use case (out of my control) calls for showing all the dates of the year and adding a label to the unfinished portion of the year. – jboeke Nov 13 '18 at 18:32
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    Year from date (YFD) is not, as far as I know, in actual use, but it would be completely parallel. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 13 '18 at 20:15
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In a graph or table where some of the statistics come from true data preceding the current date, and other statistics are estimates for the time after it, accountants and scientists generally call the first part "actual" and the second part "projected".

If you need a term analogous to "YTD" to refer to the second time period, I suggest "remainder". I'm not sure if it's common to use any such qualifier, it's usually obvious from other labeling of the chart.

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"The rest of the year" would be by far the most idiomatic expression in the US.

  • Please elaborate, why is this the case? – JJJ Apr 13 at 0:18
  • @jjj - Duh, because that's what people normally say. – Hot Licks Apr 13 at 0:41

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