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Is there another word for "Anthropomorphize" that could be used against another person. For instance, in the West the vast majority are familiar with 3 meals a day, breakfast, lunch and dinner.

However this is far from universal. If I was discussing meals with someone from an Amazonian tribe, I would maybe want to avoid asking about breakfast, lunch and dinner since they may not follow such a system.

But to say that I was "anthropomorphizing" would be offensive and rightly so. That would be saying that I was treating a non-human as a human which isn't true.

Is there a human to human equivalent meaning I am avoiding my own cultural bias when describing the practices of another human?

Many thanks.

I hope this post doesn't come across as offensive, I am really trying to avoid it.

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    @Tuffy I disagree they are using it exactly right "But to say that I was avoiding " 'anthropomorphizing' would be offensive and rightly so. That would be saying that I was treating a non-human as a human which isn't true.". I think I corrected this line to make it say what the OP meant – WendyG Nov 6 '18 at 13:52
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    @Tuffy, the OP is using the word anthropomorphise correctly. – WendyG Nov 6 '18 at 14:02
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    I am sorry, but I cannot see the question means by 'anthropomorphise' in this context. How would asking people from remote non-industrialised tribes about 'breakfast', 'lunch' and dinner involve anybody anthropomorphising anyone? They are as anthropoid as the rest of humanity, whether or not they sleep in modern beds, use syphon lavatories or eat fast food from plastic. – Tuffy Nov 6 '18 at 15:27
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    @WendyG I don't understand when it's said that the OP is using "anthropomorphise" correctly. "Anthropomorphise" is attributing human qualities or characteristics to non-human things, either living or non-living. What the OP seems to be talking about is attributing to another ethnicity the characteristics of one's own ethnicity. Have I misread something? – Zebrafish Nov 6 '18 at 15:28
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    @Zebrafish exactly you are correct, which is why the OP says they CAN'T use "Anthropomorphise". But they use it to show the kind of word they want, the way they want the word suggestion to work. – WendyG Nov 6 '18 at 17:13
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That would be generalizing (actually a hypernym which can be used in a broader range of situations).

If I was discussing meals with someone from an Amazonian tribe, I would maybe want to avoid generalizing [asking about breakfast, lunch and dinner since they may not follow such a system].

ODO:

generalize (British generalise)
VERB
1 [no object] Make a general or broad statement by inferring from specific cases.

‘What is unacceptable, to say the least, is to generalize about the uses and customs of nearly half a billion people who cover close to one sixth of the Earth's surface.’

‘Eating habits in Germany vary by social class and milieu, but it is possible to generalize about the behavior of the inclusive middle class, which has emerged in the prosperous postwar era.’

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