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For example: 'He contrived a plan to thwart his promotion'. From what I could find , 'contrive' had the meaning 'to invent , devise'. So like we can say that 'He devised a plan'/'He invented a scheme' etc , it should be correct right? I could not find any sentences that used 'contrive' this particular way tho. ELI5

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  • Please see my comments at michael.hor257k below.
    – Kris
    Nov 6, 2018 at 8:52

1 Answer 1

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"Contrive" means to plan, so seemingly "contrive a plan" would be a redundant repetition.

However, the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary gives the following example sentence in its definition of contrive:

They contrived a plan to defraud the company.

This comes under the meaning of:

to think of or make something, for example a plan or a machine, in a clever way

So I guess that means yes (in the right context).


See also Ngram.

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    No hasty decisions. Contrive is not a synonym of plan.
    – Kris
    Nov 6, 2018 at 8:47
  • In the same resource you cited, see def: 3 contrive something to think of or make something, for example a plan or a machine, in a clever way They contrived a plan to defraud the company. -- Note the phrase "contrived a plan."
    – Kris
    Nov 6, 2018 at 8:48
  • OTOH, the nGram for "contrived a plan" follows the same profile as for "contrived" -- so the decline is in the usage of the verb itself and not the phrase.
    – Kris
    Nov 6, 2018 at 8:50
  • @Kris. So, would it be okay to state 'contrived' as well as 'contrived a plan' ? *Whenever contextually appropriate ofcourse!
    – user323059
    Nov 6, 2018 at 9:36
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    @Kris I have no idea what you want or why you keep pesting me. Please cease and desist. Nov 6, 2018 at 9:48

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