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Should I use "like" or "as if" before a statement containing a preposition?

Such as,

John and Jane went together like/as if peas in a pod.

Thanks.

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You may use the words 'like' or "as if" to connect the two parts of a sentence. In your sample, you are connecting the subject/predicate with a prepositional phrase. Your sentence should state "like peas in a pod" as "peas in a pod" is a direct object.

  • Thanks. While on the subject, does this mean I should always use "like" when connecting subject/predicate to a prepositional phrase? (such as the original example) – Leo Oct 28 '18 at 21:32
  • Are you comparing the two parts of the sentence? – suse Oct 29 '18 at 2:33
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Both the variants described can be seen as deleted forms:

John and Jane went together like peas in a pod.

John and Jane went together like peas in a pod go together.

...........

John and Jane went together as if peas in a pod.

John and Jane went together as if they were peas in a pod.

There's little to choose between these (original) paraphrases, other than that the one using 'like' is more common and hence sounds more natural.

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