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  1. You will receive your money back under the condition that the product (is / be / will be / ?) returned in the original packaging.

  2. This method removes the constraint that the batteries (are / be / will be / ?) fully charged at the time of activation.

Is any of the options correct? If so, why it and not the others?

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  1. The correct formulation is: "You will receive your money back on condition that it is returned..."

If you were being really pedantic/old-fashioned you could say "...on condition that it be returned...", using the subjunctive form.

  1. It is not clear what you want to say. None of the alternatives you offer makes complete sense to me. I could understand "... the condition that the batteries must be/ have to be/ should be/ are required to be..."
  • Thanks @JeremyC. Re 2, in this example I'm trying to say that other methods require fully charged batteries at the time of activation, and this new method described in the text is special in the sense that it doesn't require that, and therefore is superior. For some reason "this method removes the constraint that the batteries must be fully charged at the time of activation" sounds weird to me, but I'm not sure why. – Oded R. Oct 29 '18 at 11:51
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Neither is the middle option, but choosing between the first and third depends on what you're trying to say. For #1, are you promising you'll return the product later, or that it's already returned? Similarly, is the constraint that the batteries are charged now, the time of activation? Or is the constraint that the batteries are charged at some future time of activation?

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