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Please help me...

I saw a news titile like this: INDONESIA TO REVIEW CHINA’S BELT AND ROAD PROJECTS IF PRABOWO BEATS WIDODO IN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

Here where i saw it https://amp.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2169655/indonesia-review-chinas-belt-and-road-projects-if-prabowo

Is the meaning of "to review" is the same as "will review"?

marked as duplicate by Laurel, sumelic, Community Oct 23 '18 at 9:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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To-Infinitives are a bit weird. I find Holt to explain it best (pun not intended :) ).

An infinitive is a verb form that can be used as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Most infinitives begin with to.

NOUN To win is their ambition. [To win is the subject.] He likes to write. [To write is the direct object.]

ADJECTIVE A few letters to mail remain in the outbox. [To mail modifies letters.]

ADVERB Her sister is coming to talk. [To talk modifies the verb is coming.] It felt good to rest. [To rest modifies the adjective good.] The lizard moved too quickly to catch. [To catch modifies the adverb quickly.]

excerpt from Holt Elements of Language Fourth Course.

after reading that, I hope you have your answer.

And yes, in most other languages this kind of structuring is translated to will+infinitive.

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Newspaper headlines have a specific grammar with elliptical forms and omissions of articles, auxiliaries, etc.

In the given headline we have the infinitive used in the function of the predicate. The traditional predicate would be 'will review'.

  • This is it. The reason "To" vs "Will" is used here is likely because of headline style. Not only does "To" have fewer letters, it also gives it a more active voice. – Balaz2ta Oct 23 '18 at 7:26
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"Review" in and of itself is both a noun and a verb.

NOUN: a formal assessment or examination of something with the possibility or intention of instituting change if necessary.

VERB: examine or assess (something) formally with the possibility or intention of instituting change if necessary.

In this case, it is being used with the verb form's definition. That said, it is completely reliant on context.

  • I know what "review" means in verb and noun. But when you read the title only, it is hard to understand the meaning of "to review". From the content i read, I think the sentence meaning should be: INDONESIA "will review" CHINA’S BELT AND ROAD PROJECTS "again", IF PRABOWO BEATS WIDODO IN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. Am I right? – DBams Oct 23 '18 at 5:00
  • Your question title is inherently wrong in this case, as I already answered in my comment. The headline is using "To" + "Verb", not + "Noun". Your question itself reflects that you know that it isn't using Review as a noun, though, so this implies the question as pointless since your intended meaning is unfocused and split. That said, to answer this, though: Yes, that is what the headline is conveying. – Sora Tamashii Oct 23 '18 at 13:04

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