0

Is "time" plural in the expressions "all the time" and "all these time"? Which is correct?

The first result I get on Google states that the latter is not idiomatic, but apparently "all these moments" are better... I would like to stick to the word 'time', however.

Context:

Even after all this time, he could still remember...

  • 2
    Did you post the right link? It says '"All these times" is not idiomatic.', which is not saying that it's correct. – Laurel Oct 22 '18 at 23:08
  • 1
    "All these time" is not correct, and the linked answer does not say it is. Read more carefully. – michael.hor257k Oct 22 '18 at 23:09
  • Sorry, it appears that I did not read the link fully. So it was not necessarily correct. – Yuu Oct 22 '18 at 23:14
  • There's also the question of if there are discrete moments in time (as in your link). For example if someone was late six times in the past week and when asked gave an excuse you might say "Do you remember all these times you were late?" This is different than the example in the link "Do you remember all these times?" which feels odd to my ear without context/an antecedent for "these times" . If you have the context I would say 'time' is not plural and you should use 'these times'. – Dan Oct 23 '18 at 0:55
  • 1
    Interestingly, this question appears to hark more deeply at the methods by which English speakers count, such as less vs fewer. "Fewer" is appropriate where the referenced quantity is an integer. "Less" when not definitively an integer. "Fewer than six people" "Less than six percent of people" And even more vague logic applies when referencing Time. Time itself is immutable, so cannot be plural. However instances in time are, by definition, plural, so are rightly referred to as times. – CJPN Oct 23 '18 at 2:29
1

'Time' in the abstract sense is uncountable, as in 'all the time' or 'after all this time'. However, as Dan says, 'a time' can also mean an occasion when something happened, as in 'you were late six times'. So you could say 'Even after all these times you have been unkind to me, I still love you'.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.