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I'm looking for a child-friendly word to say that a certain object is [neither big nor small].

It's for dialogues of the kind:

A: My pencil case is big.

B: My pencil case is ?????.

C: My pencil case is small.

EDIT

This was for a 6-year-old. She didn't know the word to use and I suggested 'average size', but someone suggested 'average' was a difficult word for a 6 year old. Not being a native speaker, I didn't insist. The exchange not being particularly friendly, I refrained from asking for a word the person might deem more appropriate for children.

I am, however, thinking about using that kind of dialogue with my classes of children and, again, I was hoping for something that sounds simple.

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    "It's medium-sized" I think this Q is better suited for ELL. – Mari-Lou A Oct 22 '18 at 18:29
  • My pencil case fits your hand nicely. – Weather Vane Oct 22 '18 at 18:44
  • @Mari-LouA: This was for a 6-year-old. She didn't know the word to use and I suggested 'average size', but someone suggested 'average' was a difficult word for a 6 year old. – Sara Costa Oct 22 '18 at 19:06
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    This information should go on the question, not added in a comment. Saying that, there's nothing difficult about understanding or teaching the word "average" to a 6-year-old girl learning English, it's a very useful adjective to learn! – Mari-Lou A Oct 22 '18 at 19:10
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    @Mari-LouA I should worry about using the word ‘average’ for this purpose. My reason is there is already much confusion in the public understanding of ‘average’. It should be kept in reserve till they have a sure grasp of the mathematical of the term. Getting the habit of using the word ‘average’ to mean ‘middling’ (in the middle) could muddy the waters, I fear. – Tuffy Oct 22 '18 at 20:49
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In my (Irish-English) book, 'medium-sized' is the most idiomatic option and by the age of 6, I would expect children to be becoming familiar with the term. I would shy away from 'average' for the same reasons as given by Tuffy above. 'Regular' may well work in an American-English context, but is less familiar to a cisatlantic audience.

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