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I'd like to know how to analyze the inversion structure below.

Has the prepositional phrase from this hardship exchanged its position with the subject a country that is more capable of coping with inflation?

Or has from this hardship moved to the front, followed by switching around the verb emerged and the subject a country that is more capable of coping with inflation?

The end result of both proposals seems to be the same. Still, I'd like to know which makes better sense.

From this hardship emerged a country that is more capable of coping with inflation. (This seems to be derived from below.)

A country that is more capable of coping with inflation emerged from this hardship.

  • “From this hardship, a country emerged more capable of coping with inflation.” Is also correct – QuIcKmAtHs Oct 15 '18 at 12:35
  • Thank you, but I'm asking how to analyze the inversion structure. – Apollyon Oct 15 '18 at 12:38
  • Can you elaborate what you mean? It seems rather vague to me... – QuIcKmAtHs Oct 15 '18 at 12:39
  • Please see the edit to the question. – Apollyon Oct 15 '18 at 12:41
  • How could anyone tell the difference between the two analyses presented? They're syntactically identical. This kind of inversion is common enough with locatives and predicates of existence or motion -- In the door walked Bill -- but there is no way to tell objectively whether the adverb fronted before the subject was moved, or whether they occurred simultaneously. Note that Time is not a part of syntactic transformations -- there isn't any "before" or "after" unless one is speaking of the transformational Cycle, and this is a simple sentence so there is no Cycle to speak of. – John Lawler Oct 15 '18 at 13:05

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