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For example, the phrase "The birds bodys color" as if to refer to the color of the bird's body, so do I write "The bird's body's color", "The birds body's color", or "The bird's bodys color"? Please do not say to write "The bird's body color"- even though thats the most sensical answer this is a theoretical phrase for me and Im just trying to find out if I can put 2 apostrophe words next to each other.

To clear it up, the sentence I'm actually talking about is this:

"How Father bird’s body’s sound breaking between teeth".

Is this grammatically correct? (I know it sounds weird but this is for poetry and this is the only way for the rhyme scheme to work.

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  • To clear it up, the sentence Im actually talking about is this "How Father bird’s body’s sound breaking between teeth". Is this grammatically correct? (I know it sounds weird but this is for poetry and this is the only way for the rhyme scheme to work
    – Julia
    Oct 14 '18 at 23:23
  • Julia, your explanatory comment is critical to understanding your question. Instead of posting it as a comment (where it can be overlooked), that kind of detail needs to be added to the question itself using the edit link. I've done this for you on this occasion. :-) Oct 15 '18 at 0:09
  • Can you add context for “How Father bird’s body’s sound breaking between teeth”? It’s not clear what it’s supposed to mean, and it’s probably not grammatically correct.
    – Ry-
    Oct 15 '18 at 0:48
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Using consecutive possessives is perfectly fine from a grammar perspective. For example:

"My uncle's mother-in-law's cousin's daughter's cat's fleas"

is grammatical and makes sense (well, at least at a logic level).

However, sometimes it's best to find a less complex expression that doesn't require the reader to stop and decode the words.

"Father bird" is a bit unusual; "body's sound" is quite unfamiliar; "sound breaking between teeth" makes no sense at all (how does sound "break"?). So the reader's difficulty in taking in all these parts ("Father bird’s body’s sound breaking between teeth") creates a risk that they will stumble, and the value of the poetic elements will have been sacrificed to maintain the rhyme. You could instead try something like:

Sound of Father bird's body breaking between teeth

(assuming that is the sound you mean). Or if maintaining the number of syllables is important but you're comfortable being innovative:

Father bird's body - sound: breaking between teeth

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