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I am translating a text to English that uses a lot of repetitive synonyms in a row, and I am wondering how to best form a sentence that sounds English without creating confusion. Which connector to use and how to punctuate.

Can I use "i.e.", "also known as", or just use "or"?

In some point, when glucose levels fall, for example between meals or during intense physical activity, the liver can release the stored glycose, i.e, glucose stores for cells to use.

In some point, when glucose levels fall, for example between meals or during intense physical activity, the liver can release the stored glycose, or glucose stores for cells to use.

And what to do if there are three synonyms that all readers might not know are synonyms?

Is this correct or confusing?

It is thought that the blood sugar level, blood sugar concentration, or blood glucose level increases if we eat these foods.

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I suggest you change "or" / "i.e." to as etc. The sentence also starts incorrectly.

At some point, when glucose levels fall (for example between meals or during intense physical activity), the liver can release the stored glycose as glucose which cells can use.

  • Note: I don't know much biology but assume glycose is different from glucose. – Weather Vane Oct 11 '18 at 18:41
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If you were the author then there is the editorial injunction "Explain, or omit". Three synonyms in one sentence are too many. If your reader needs to know all three then use as many sentences as are required to convey that information. If the reader does not need to know, then don't tell them .

But different rules can apply to translations. How faithful is your translation supposed to be to the actual sentence structure of the original author? If you are stuck with their cumbersome sentences, maybe you can introduce some explanation of synonyms in parentheses.

  • In my language there is a connecting word that means "equal to" that is specifically used for connecting synonyms or terms/phrases with equal meaning, so for us it isn't that weird. And there must be cases in English also where sometimes it would be useful to list all the synonyms if the reader should know that the terms are equal. In English I guess I could put (also known as) in parentheses, but that ruins the flow. For e.g. – OrangeSunflower Oct 12 '18 at 9:34
  • For e.g. Diabetes mellitus type 1, also known as type 1 diabetes, is a form of.... Is that the only way of naming synonyms? Isn't there a shorter way? Does i.e. not fit there? – OrangeSunflower Oct 12 '18 at 9:41

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