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Floccinaucinihilipilification means, according to Oxford dictionaries, "The action or habit of estimating something as worthless." Is there a replacement that conveys this meaning exactly? Floccinaucinihilipilification is too complicated to use in regular writing, and can often come across as insincere in usage.

Usage: 'Humans are quick to partake in the floccinaucinihilipilification process, it has happened before and it will happen repeatedly until evolution explicates perfect men.’

Recently, an Indian politician used this word while introducing a new book in which he criticizes the Indian Prime Minister. His exact sentence was: "My new book, The Paradoxical Prime Minister, is more than just a 400-page exercise in floccinaucinihilipilification. Pre-order it to find out why!" See his tweet here.

There are other words that convey the idea of estimating something to be worthless -- like "dismiss", "belittle" etc., but neither of have the connotation of it being a habit.

Flocccinaucinihilipilification, apart from specific usage, can also be used to (for example), accuse someone of being dismissive about everything -- is there a word that would convey the same exact meaning?

To be a bit more specific, is there a word that can replace it in the sentence: "I neither appreciate or want to indulge in your floccinaucinihilipilification." without loss of meaning?

  • Can you include a sample sentence where you would use this word? – Laurel Oct 10 '18 at 19:23
  • A word or phrase request can easily attract a long list of answers when it’s too subjective – more of a poll or request for ideas. Unfortunately neither are a good fit for the Stack Exchange model. A Stack Exchange question is objective and specific enough that it has a clearly “right” answer. See: “Real questions have answers, not items or ideas or opinions”, “Single word requests, crosswords, and the fight against mediocrity”. – MetaEd Oct 10 '18 at 19:33
  • If possible, add more details of research you’ve done, especially solutions you’ve already rejected, and why. Include the desired connotation, register (formality), part of speech, and context in which it is to be used, and provide the exact enclosing sentence or passage. If this is not possible because you really do have a subjective question, a welcoming place to ask for advice is our English Language & Usage Chat. – MetaEd Oct 10 '18 at 19:34
  • @WorldGov the improvements should be a question edit, not in comment. – Weather Vane Oct 10 '18 at 19:36
  • Done. @MetaEd -- Could you review the question? – WorldGov Oct 10 '18 at 19:51
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I suggest belittling from belittle in the Oxford Dictionary.

Dismiss (someone or something) as unimportant.

So an example sentence could be

Your disparaging remarks about Darwin's theory were belittling.

Another phrase is putting down something or someone.

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    Great suggestions! But neither of those include the idea of it being a habit. For example, in the sentence, "Humans are quick to partake in floccinaucinihilipilification", no specific idea is said to be belittled or dismissed; the sentence just says that humans have a habit of estimating something or someone as worthless. – WorldGov Oct 10 '18 at 19:42
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    @WorldGov, "humans are quick to partake in belittling". Works fine. – Ben Oct 10 '18 at 21:10

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