0

I have a sentence that is framed as

I know I did, especially when I’d be acquiesced into something like listening to a boring lecture or playing soccer.

I've been told that this is incorrect, or 'not kosher'. How can I rewrite this to be more appropriate without changing the meaning?

  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – tchrist Oct 7 '18 at 15:04
1

I think what you should not do is using to acquiesce in sth. in passive voice. Use active voice:

Every student has asked himself this fundamental question at some key points in time, “What is my purpose ? What am I really supposed to be doing ?”. I know I did, especially when I acquiesced in something like listening to a boring lecture, or playing soccer.

Or if you want to put more emphasise on being forced to do something (and you respectfully and out of courtesy decided to accept the situation although you actually found it unpleasant or inappopriate):

Every student has asked himself this fundamental question at some key points in time, “What is my purpose ? What am I really supposed to be doing ?”. I know I did, especially when I was forced to acquiesce in something like listening to a boring lecture, or playing soccer.

This is grammatically correct. However, it has a problem with semantics: to acquiesc already carries an element of meaning saying "there is some force in play that makes me do things I do not actually want to do". Adding to be forced would be at least to some extent redundant. You can avoid this by simply saying:

Every student has asked himself this fundamental question at some key points in time, “What is my purpose ? What am I really supposed to be doing ?”. I know I did, especially when I was forced to something like listening to a boring lecture, or playing soccer.

Side topic:

Your combination of to acquiesc in sth. plus playing soccer has an (unwanted or wanted) comical effect. Basically you are saying

I acquiesc in running hectically around and chasing a ball

which contrasts the idea of you moving quickly and forcefully whith your supposed quiecy, as the verb to acquiesc of course is rooted in the Latin verb quiēscō (“repose, lie still”). So, acquiesc in running is a bit contradictive.

  • Understood, thanks! Love the explanation of the transitive and intransitive verbs as well – bholagabbar Oct 7 '18 at 9:43
  • The comical effect is intentional, it's supposed to be a bit eye catching - meant as an opening for a grad school statement of purpose – bholagabbar Oct 8 '18 at 6:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.