-1

If you had wanted to cancel the reservation, you would not have gotten a full refund.

Should you have wanted to cancel the reservation, you would not have gotten a full refund.

I can't decide if this second sentence is possible, and if so, what it is.

Is it a third conditional sentence?

Is it possible to make this construction?

Does it have the same meaning as the first sentence?

  • I would say: If you had wanted to cancel the reservation, you should not have gotten a full refund. However, although grammatical, I should note that this sentence doesn't actually make sense. If you got a full refund then you did cancel the reservation. So, I would drop the not.) – Jason Bassford Oct 5 '18 at 17:03
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of "Should" as formal IF – FumbleFingers Oct 5 '18 at 17:05
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    Is it supposed to make any difference to this question whether it's If you had wanted to cancel... as opposed to If you had cancelled... ? – FumbleFingers Oct 5 '18 at 17:07
  • But 'should' can replace the 'if' part in conditionals in certain circumstances. I can say for example, 'should you have a question, please raise your hand.' Or at least I believe this is correct. – Claire Oct 5 '18 at 17:11
  • I know the structure is odd, but is it possible? – Claire Oct 5 '18 at 17:13
0

While it is grammatically correct, the addition of the extra layer of conditional complexity conveys the diplomatic too-carefully-chosen word choice of high society or just someone acting holier-than-thou. If that's not what you're going for, I'd stick to number 1.

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