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Is there a gender neutral alternative to "this guy", to refer to yourself in the third person in a gender neutral way?

Example of use:

Guess who just got a raise? {This guy!}

  • I think anyone would say {I did!} using the appropriate inflection of excitement. Or, to avoid using "I" you could say {We did!} using the royal/editorial we. – user22542 Oct 4 '18 at 9:30
  • Not in any way an answer but a relevant point: guy and guys is increasingly used to refer to both men and women. See, for instance, How Gender Neutral Is Guys, Really?, Slate (2016) The import of that is, of course, a different question (and the subject of the linked article). – tmgr Oct 4 '18 at 10:25
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Just a suggestion:

Guess who just got a raise? Yours truly

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    "Yours truly" is quite good, but "This fella" isn't gender neutral. – user22542 Oct 4 '18 at 9:53
  • I would upvote this if it weren't for the first suggestion which is wrong. – Jason Bassford Oct 4 '18 at 18:19
  • The word "fellow" is perceived as masculine because people has been using it that way, but etymologically it is not gender specific. – javorosas Oct 5 '18 at 10:58
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    @javorosas "Fellow" != "fella," and especially not in the sense you've linked. Besides, being "perceived as masculine" is what makes it masculine. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymological_fallacy – Azor Ahai Oct 8 '18 at 23:28
  • @AzorAhai makes sense. I've edited the answer. Thanks for taking the time to point out my mistake. – javorosas Oct 10 '18 at 11:08
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In light of your example it seems that:

{This person!} would be the actual gender neutral third person form.

But, you can also change it to any gender neutral term appropriate like:

{This happy one!}

{This star employee!}

{This past peon!}

{This (insert employer name) worker!}

You get the idea. And, congratulations if you really did get a promotion.

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/peon

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