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The responsibility to come up with an idea of building a new infrastructure which will benefit the economy of the district is transferred to a different department.

I am writing to ask if the sentence is grammarly correct.

infintive "to come up with an idea" to modify "the responsibility",

prepositional phrase "of building a new infrastructure" to modify "an idea",

adjective clause "which will benefit the economy of the district" to modify "infrastructure"

I think all three of them(infinitive,prepositional phrase, adjective clause) function as adjective , and has been wondering if it's okay to use all three of them in one sentence.Does infinitive,prepositional phrase ,adjective clause have any affect on the structure of the sentence(in terms of grammar)?

  • None of them function as an adjective - what on earth gave you that idea? The infinitival clause "to come up with an idea" is not a modifier, but a complement of "responsibility". The other two are OK, but please call "which will benefit the economy of the district" a relative clause, not an adjective clause. Not everything that modifies a noun is an adjective! – BillJ Sep 29 '18 at 14:19
  • "which will benefit the economy of the district" is a nonrestrictive relative clause and should be contained by commas, unless you mean it to be restrictive, in which case you'd use that instead of which. – Zan700 Sep 30 '18 at 2:55
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    @Zan700 "That" and "which" are perfectly acceptable in restrictive relative clauses. By and large, it's a free choice. – BillJ Sep 30 '18 at 11:36
  • @BillJ If that can only be used in restrictive relative clauses, I think it only fair that which gets domain over nonrestrictive relative clause. But, though many would mandate that separation, you're right. However, in the OP's sentence the relative clause is nonrestrictive, which would require commas whether the RP is which or that. – Zan700 Sep 30 '18 at 16:17
  • @Zan700 I'd say the OP's example is of a restrictive relative clause where either "that" or "which" are fine. The clause identifies the kind of infrastructure, i.e. one which will benefit the economy. Btw, non-restrictive that clauses are extremely rare. – BillJ Sep 30 '18 at 16:26
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This is grammatically correct:

The responsibility OF coming up with an idea FOR building a new THAT will benefit the economy of the district is transferred to a different department.

The word "responsibility," when followed by a qualifier, is generally used with "of" because the qualifier (in your case "coming up with an idea") describes the word "responsibility." "To" would be used as a function word to indicate purpose, intention, tendency, or result; these are not the meanings that you aim to convey.

The word "idea" is qualified with a purpose after it, which is why "for" is used instead of "of".

"Which" will mostly be used for nonrestrictive clauses, where the given information is not essential for the sentence to make grammatical sense. "That" should be used here because this is a restrictive clause and the sentence needs this clause to be complete.

  • "That" and "which" are perfectly acceptable in restrictive relative clauses, so the OP's sentence is fine with "which". – BillJ Sep 30 '18 at 6:39

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