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I was wondering is it right to say something this way:

You will not be "permitted access" to the work you produce.

Isn't it better to say it this way?

You will not be permitted to access to the work you produce.

I've learned that when two verbs are used in a row, the latter comes with a TO before it or an -ING after it.

  • Btw, permitted access to is an odd construction; permitted to access is vastly preferred. – Kris Sep 18 '18 at 9:46
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    @Kris, why do you say that, I wonder? permitted access to doesn't strike me as odd at all and it's a common enough phrasing. (All my links are to UK sources; there may possibly be some transatlantic variance.) – tmgr Sep 18 '18 at 10:43
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    @user316660 All else aside, the second to in the second sentence is out of place; you should get rid of it, making: You will not be permitted to access the work you produce. – tmgr Sep 18 '18 at 11:00
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Both are fine; access is used as a noun in the former, and as a verb (infinitive) in the latter.

Note: The verb permit is followed by an infinitive form of a verb (eg: to access) and not followed by a gerund (i-e ING-form of a verb, eg: permitted accessing).

  • Then how is the first sentence "fine"? – Kris Sep 18 '18 at 9:29
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    @Kris access is used as a noun in the former; You will not be permitted [Verb] access [Noun] to the work you produce. – Zeeshan Ali Sep 18 '18 at 9:38
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    But you have said permit is always followed by an infinitive. That probably needs qualifying. – Andrew Leach Sep 18 '18 at 10:03
  • @AndrewLeach Yup, that requires to be edited a bit more.. ^^ – Zeeshan Ali Sep 18 '18 at 10:06

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