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The sentence: from NPR transcript

WOOD: John Derbyshire is - so he was a writer for the National Review. He has made claims such as intelligent, well-socialized African-Americans are as rare as fancy commercial jets - right? - so things like that, very inflammatory, very incendiary. And he was a Trump supporter down the line.

In the bold sentence quoted above, isn't it that "was" indicates past tense (things that happened), so won't that contradict with "down the line" (in the future)?

And shouldn't it be like this:

"And he "might be" a Trump supporter down the line."

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  • Can you please provide the full context here? Also, state that where did you find this sentence?
    – Ahmed
    Sep 16 '18 at 15:46
  • Two answers have pointed out a different meaning for down the line. I wanted to reassure you that your understanding of the phrase is also a possible meaning, but not here - mostly because of the past tense.
    – Colin Fine
    Sep 16 '18 at 19:23
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And he was a Trump supporter down the line.

down the line idiom TFD

  1. All the way; throughout:

And shouldn't it be like this: "And he "might be" a Trump supporter down the line."

No, the idiom implies before, during and after ... all the way and throughout.

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If the sentences "And he was a Trump supporter all the way." and "And throughout he was a Trump supporter." are acceptable, your sentence is definitely grammatical.

down the line (The Free Dictionary)

  1. Also, all along the line. All the way, throughout.

For example, We've found numerous errors down the line.

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