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I read a sentence:

There were more than five times the number of students in chemistry as the number of students in physics.

Does that mean (1) the number of students in chemistry divided by the number of students in physics is greater than five or (2) the number of students in physics divided by the number of students in chemistry is greater than five?

I know what "five times as much" means, but I'm confused by the sentence above.

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  • Either way, the sentence is malformed. It should either be: (a) “There we’re more than five times the number of students in physics THAN in chemistry; or (b) There were more than five times AS MANY students in physics AS in chemistry.
    – Tuffy
    Sep 14, 2018 at 6:44

1 Answer 1

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Chemistry had more students. I would use ‘than’ in place of the ‘as’ though. ‘As’ doesn’t sound quite right to me.

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  • It makes more sense now when you replace "as" with "than". Sep 15, 2018 at 1:59

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