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This question already has an answer here:

"My train arrives at 7.30 tomorrow".. or "My train will arrive at 7.30 tomorrow"
Which one is gramatically correct?
Usually I use the future but I heard a lot of people that use the first sentence and I don't understand why.
Thank you in advance

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, Roger Sinasohn, Drew, Michael Rybkin, Scott Sep 5 '18 at 3:21

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    You don't have to use will when you refer to the future. Will is just another modal auxiliary verb, not "the future tense". English refers to the future in lots of ways, most of which are in the present tense: He goes tomorrow; he's going tomorrow; he is to go tomorrow; he's going to go tomorrow (pronounced "gonna go"), etc. They're all grammatical. – John Lawler Sep 4 '18 at 14:00
  • Even he would go tomorrow is grammatical. – Lawrence Sep 4 '18 at 15:17
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    @Lawrence: Even if he went tomorrow, it would still be grammatical! :) – FumbleFingers Sep 4 '18 at 15:59
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    @FumbleFingers Indeed, though it might be a bridge too far (or not!) had he gone tomorrow. :) – Lawrence Sep 4 '18 at 16:04
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    @Lawrence: Let's not burn all our contextual bridges! I'm really surprised he left today. Had he gone tomorrow he could have used a cheap Off-Peak ticket. – FumbleFingers Sep 4 '18 at 16:18
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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

You don't have to use will when you refer to the future. Will is just another modal auxiliary verb, not "the future tense". English refers to the future in lots of ways, most of which are in the present tense: He goes tomorrow; he's going tomorrow; he is to go tomorrow; he's going to go tomorrow (pronounced "gonna go"), etc. They're all grammatical.

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My train arrives at 7.30 tomorrow.. or My train will arrive at 7.30 tomorrow.

Syntactically, the modal auxiliary verb "will" has two tenses: present and preterite. Semantically, it is used to make reference to future time (about 80% of its occurrences, I believe) but also for expressing volition (as in I keep telling my son to get his hair cut, but he won't; so I've told him he has to --- notice, the refusals to get his hair cut are in the PAST, and this sentence actually entails that there IS a haircut in his future!).

The film will be seen at the Sundance festival is syntactically a present tense clause with "will" as the tensed verb. But in that example, "will" clearly expressed reference to future time --- something that could be done in various other ways as well (The film is going to be seen at the Sundance festival, The film is about to be seen at the Sundance festival, etc.).

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