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On Google, it is defined as something "extravagant but superficial display", or "to make something glamorous or showy". That doesn't sound negative to me; however, other sources make it sound as if it's negative by adding the word "ostentatious".

According to dictionary.com, ostentatious is "characterized by or given to pretentious or conspicuous show in an attempt to impress others". Further looking up the definition of pretentious states it is "characterized by assumption of dignity or importance, especially when exaggerated or undeserved".

After reading these definitions, glitz does not sound like a positive connotation to me at all. Is there another way of looking at this particular word that is known to be generally positive?

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    "Superficial" is not generally a complementary way to describe something (other than perhaps a paint). – Hot Licks Sep 3 '18 at 21:34
  • "Extravagant" isn't generally a compliment either, and "showy" also has negative connotations, e.g. being ostentatious. – Chappo Sep 3 '18 at 23:10
  • @HotLicks: you presumably mean complimentary? Ironically, in this particular case "superficial" is actually used in a complementary way ;-) – Chappo Sep 3 '18 at 23:16
  • Please don't fool yourself that "On Google…" anything. Google never provides answers; only ever links to answers and it's the links and answers you need to cite, not the fact that you found them via Google. Childishly, you might compare that to finding answers in bookshops or libraries, rather than specific books… To you, how is "ostentatious" negative - even if it is "characterized by or given to pretentious or conspicuous show in an attempt to impress others"? Could you take the Question to a site that deals with writing style? – Robbie Goodwin Sep 4 '18 at 0:02
  • "Deeper" search does not necessarily lead one to the deeper meaning. Glitz is negative. "... this particular word that is known to be generally positive," says who? – Kris Sep 4 '18 at 8:39

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