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Here's the sentence:

I used to hate planning and I still do, but once I'm done planning, everything's easier.

If I remove the phrase after the first comma, the sentence doesn't make any sense; however, since the last bit is in stark contrast to the first, wouldn't it still be considered grammatically 'correct'?

  • By "remove the phrase after the first comma", do you mean the words between the two commas? Ie, the new sentence would be "I used to hate planning and I still do, everything's easier"? – John Feltz Aug 31 '18 at 15:30
  • Yes, that would be the new sentence. – Sq.Ima Aug 31 '18 at 15:32
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The second half of your sentence does offer a different point of view from the first but that's why you have a contrasting conjunction ("but") instead of a joining one (such as "and").

Note also that grammar doesn't necessarily cover the logical coherency of a sentence. This sentence makes no sense by itself but is grammatically correct:

I hate avocados so I eat them everyday.

If you want to split your sentence into two, you can do that:

I used to hate planning and I still do. Once I'm done planning, everything's easier.

These sentences are both grammatically correct but because they seem to be somewhat at odds with each other, they sound a little off. You can fix that by adding a word to connect the two while acknowledging the contrast:

I used to hate planning and I still do. Once I'm done planning, however, everything's easier.

or

I used to hate planning and I still do. However, once I'm done planning, everything's easier.

Here the word however fills the same role as the word but in your original sentence.

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