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Here is a sentence: "Without those measurements, we cannot measure if we are progressing in the right direction."

measure is clearly a verb here, but what part of speech is measurement? (abstract noun?)

The use of measurement and measure in the same sentence does not seem like good style to me. Is this good style? I feel like the measure should be replaced with a synonym because measurement is in the same sentence. Is there a style rule or guideline that says this?

  • you measure to get the measurements. It doesn’t require measurements in order to measure. without measurements you can’t determine whether you are progressing... – Jim Aug 28 '18 at 23:13
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Your original sentence -

Without those measurements, we cannot measure if we are progressing in the right direction.

  • does not make much technical sense. You cannot measure directions. Progress can be measured or gauged. Direction can be judged, determined, figured out, etc. Consider:

Without those measurements, we cannot judge with any certainty if we are progressing in the right direction.

Or -

Without those measurements, we cannot determine whether we are progressing in the right direction.

Etc.

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