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I encountered it on Theogony of Hesiod on verse 44. I don't have any idea of my own. Anything is very appreciated.

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    Try a dictionary. Hint: when you have more than one word, you can look them up separately. – AndyT Aug 22 '18 at 13:20
  • honorable family – Billy Aug 22 '18 at 15:06
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the poster could have found the answer in any general-reference dictionary. – Sven Yargs Aug 22 '18 at 17:49
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Context: celebrate the august clan of the gods in song, Theogony of Hesiod, line 44

Clan has connotations of family or tribe. MW:

a group of people tracing descent from a common ancestor

August in this sense (with the stress on the second syllable!) means worthy of honour or respect. Again from MW:

marked by majestic dignity or grandeur

So august clan here means something similar to dignified family.

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August can mean noble or majestic. So, without the sentence I would assume it means something like noble clan or venerable tribe or something like that.

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    DV for answering a question that shows no research by the OP. – AndyT Aug 22 '18 at 13:21
  • Your dictionary source (Wiktionary) provides two definitions and four synonyms for august: "1. Awe-inspiring, majestic, noble, venerable. [example:] an august patron of the arts 2. Of noble birth. [example:] an august lineage". If you included that more complete wording in your answer, I would upvote the answer—because your final sentence seems quite accurate. I understand the theory behind downvoting accurate answers to "bad" questions, but I think the better approach is to delete the bad question. Also, why downvote one such answer but not the other one (posted 6 minutes later)? – Sven Yargs Aug 22 '18 at 17:48
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    @Knotell: Undoubtedly, Charl E's answer would be superior to Gulliver's even if Gulliver added the full Wictionary definition of august. And if the downvote had been cast on grounds that Wiktionary is an inferior resource, I would have thought, "Hmm. Okay." But the actual reason given for the downvote is that the question is bad, and I don't see why that rationale applies to the goose but not to the gander here. Also, as I said in my first comment, I disagree with the idea of punishing answerers—regardless of the legitimacy of their answers—as a strategy for dealing with bad questions. – Sven Yargs Aug 22 '18 at 22:05
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    @SvenYargs - The rationale for downvoting one and not the other is that the other didn't exist at the time. It appears Charl E's answer appeared twenty seconds after my comment. Charl E now has a downvote too. – AndyT Aug 23 '18 at 8:07
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    @AndyT: I applaud your consistent application of what I consider a flawed rationale. (And I have upvoted Charl E's answer, although I expect a moderator to delete the question and answers in the fullness of time.) – Sven Yargs Aug 23 '18 at 8:14

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