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In the following sentence, would it be correct to use a comma to before every day?

  1. We find loans for people with bad credit or no history of borrowing, every day.

  2. We find loans for people with bad credit or no history of borrowing every day.

  3. We find loans for people with bad credit, or no history of borrowing, every day.

And how would it change the situation if I changed the wording to this:

  1. We find loans for people with bad credit or no history of borrowing, all day, every day.

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  • Thanks for the answers Reg. Good job it's not a maths site as there are only 3 possible answers, not 4. Also, that sentence isn't going anywhere near any inbox - it's for a demo project with a guarantor lender, and I just didn't want to look illiterate :) – John Ohara Aug 17 '18 at 11:12
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2) is grammatical:

We do x for a or b every day. Even if the sentence is long, it is grammatical.

My suggestion is:

  • We find loans for people with bad credit or no borrowing history every day.

Edit: after thinking about this, I prefer:

  • We find loans every day for people with bad credit or no borrowing history.

All day, every day sounds like you might be bored. I would avoid it.

The adverbial phrase every day has to go at the beginning with a comma:

  • Every day, we find X for A and B.

In the middle, though here that would be quite awkward:

  • We find X every day for A and B.

At the end with no comma as given in my first suggestion.

Cambridge Dictionary: They usually go in end position.

They sometimes go in front position especially if we want to emphasise the adverb.

adverbs of time

[joke: Dear God of Credit: Please don't give anyone a sub-prime loan.]

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