I'm looking for an unambiguous wording for the "changed" term for these scenarios:

I've a time range from August 6th to August 10th.

A: I'm changing this time range to August 13th to August 17th
B: I'm changing this time range to August 7th to August 9th
C: I'm changing this time range to August 6th to August 17th

A is a completely different time tange, while B shrinks the existing one and C extends it.

I'm looking for an unambiguous wording for A and B+C combined.

Update:

Sample for scenario A: If time range is ___ the data should be completely removed.

Sample for scenario B+C: If time range is ___ the data should be updated.

  • 1
    I'm not clear what you're asking. Can you give examples of things you didn't find suitable and reasons why wording it as in your question (where it's pretty unambiguous) is unsuitable? I think specifying dates as you've done is about as unambiguous as you're going to get. – Pam Aug 10 at 13:35
  • @Pam agreed. Are you hung up on the word 'range' for some reason? Would 'interval' work better? – John Feltz Aug 10 at 13:37
  • I updated my question. – Alexander Zeitler Aug 10 at 13:56
  • The word 'range' doesn't necessarily mean just the duration. The start and end points can be part of the 'range'. – John Feltz Aug 10 at 14:25
  • 1
    I still don't understand what "A and B+C combined" means. Can you give an example sentence of that, even if it's ungrammatical? Moreover, a simple The dates are now X to Y applies regardless of any particular sense. So, I'm failing to understand why there's a need to distinguish between "completely different," "shrinking," and "growing." Is the specific semantic distinction required for an unstated purpose? – Jason Bassford Aug 10 at 15:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As has already been pointed out in the comments, this question is less than clear. The best interpretation of it is that the OP is trying to express, in general terms, the difference between, on one side, the changes such as A, and, on the other side, the changes such as B and C, because these different kinds of changes call for different follow-up actions. That difference appears to be that a change of the first kind results in a range (interval) that does not overlap the original one, while a change of the second kind results in a range that overlaps it. A clear way to reformulate the sample sentences at the end of the question could thus be:

If the new range does not overlap the original one, the data should be completely removed.

If the new range overlaps the original one, the data should be updated.

These are admittedly reformulations that do not fill the blanks with a single word, but chances are that insisting on a single word would produce something that would, in fact, be less clear.

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