-1

I can't understand why we are using present perfect here:

to lose something temporarily by forgetting where you have put it

why this is not correct:

to lose something temporarily by forgetting where you put it

  • What is the context? Please mention where you found this and include the entire sentence if there is more. – Laurel Aug 9 '18 at 15:48
  • Also, please transfer this question to ell.stackexchange.com. – VTH Aug 9 '18 at 16:14
  • Who's telling you either version might be either "correct" or "incorrect"? I can't see any reason to think that. Here's the Perfect version in The Semantics of English Negative Prefixes, and Simple Past in Cambridge Learner's Dictionary. Both in the context of defining mislay, as it happens. – FumbleFingers Aug 9 '18 at 16:17
-3

Using the verb put in present perfect tense conveys the meaning that the action of putting occurred just once, and it (the action) is complete by the present moment, and the results of the action are important at the present moment. On the other hand, multiple repetitions of putting and losing would be better conveyed by simple past tense. Consider the difference:

to lose something temporarily by forgetting where you have put it after the last use

versus

repeatedly to lose something temporarily by forgetting where you put it after using

That being said, the difference is not huge and may be unessential in oral communication.

-4
  • To lose something temporarily by forgetting where you have put it
  • To lose something temporarily by forgetting where you put it

The first sentence is correct because the effect of the addressed object has remained. You forgot where you put it and temporarily you are not remembering where you put it. so the act of forgetting and its effect remains from past until the present moment.

"To lose something temporarily by forgetting where" requires to be finished by a clause that attaches to the meaning of the sentence: temporarily it is lost and it is still lost. So it should be finished with "you have put it."

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