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We say: I don't know whether he is right.

Is it acceptable to say: I don't know he's right or wrong.

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  • You can say: I don't know (that) he is right. I don't know he is British. I don't know he wants it. But the meaning will be that of assertion, rather than doubt.
    – user253826
    Jul 26, 2018 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

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You should say, "I don't know if he's right or wrong."

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  • You mean "I don't know he's right or wrong." is never said, not even in spoken English?
    – Hank
    Jul 26, 2018 at 13:45
  • Correct. We always say it like: "I don't know if he's right or wrong" or "I don't know whether he is right or wrong."
    – jmrpink
    Jul 26, 2018 at 14:28
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We use "if" or "whether" to introduce clauses after verbs of doubting:

I don’t know if I can drive. My foot really hurts.

Look at If or whether: indirect questions at the Cambridge Dictionary.

I don't know whether he is right or not

I don't know whether he is right or wrong

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  • Already know that. Just wanted to know if it's ever said in spoken English!
    – Hank
    Jul 26, 2018 at 13:44
  • I don't think it is correct. If you google it there is no result except what is written on this page. But, "I don't know if he's right or wrong" appears 52,000 times!
    – Bob
    Jul 26, 2018 at 13:57

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