0

Examples:

Through selfless duty, devoted communication, and new experiences will I strive to grow my connections and understand those around me.

Through selfless duty, devoted communication, and new experiences I will strive to grow my connections and understand those around me.

Should it state "will I" or "I will"? My guess is the former, but what are your thoughts?

closed as off-topic by green_ideas, JMP, jimm101, Cascabel, Scott Jul 27 '18 at 2:54

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2

"I will" is more common. Subject-verb inversion e.g. "will I" is somewhat poetic and archaic, but not incorrect. It is a type of anastrophe. Some may feel that it makes for a formal or literary style. As Grammarphobia says, "a usage that some readers find catchy may seem corny or pretentious to others". "Selfless duty" doesn't really mean anything - does your character mean selfless devotion to duty? I am doubtful about "devoted communication". The overall effect is of fine words that don't mean much. Perhaps those effects are intentional, to portray the (perhaps priggish) nature of the character? The utterance quoted sounds like an oath, intended to be repeated by someone being inducted or sworn-in to some kind of office or priesthood.

Follows the Subject

1

Both are correct English.

  • The first is more poetic, which might suit a "declaration" or "resolution".
  • The second is more of a natural "statement" and more commonly used.

So for the purpose of making an oath or a promise: the first sentence is better.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.