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As I was preparing for the ACT, I came across this question:

Phrase: "Key and Peele is at its best when it deals with questions of what is expected of mixed-race people, in a society reluctant to let go of racial stereotypes"

Is that right? Or is the phrase below correct:

Key and Peele is at its best when it deals with questions of what is expected of mixed-race people in a society reluctant to let go of racial stereotypes" (No comma before in a society)

If so, why? Thanks.

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Normally you wouldn't have a comma before a prepositional phrase at the end of a sentence, eg. He got up in the morning. She got it done in the nick of time. If you do use a comma, it has an effect similar to a dash -- in that it makes you pause and gives the part after the dash some extra emphasis.

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