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What may be a word for this gesture: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯?

It's kind of a shrug, like when someone asks where you want to go for dinner, but any option will do, so instead of saying anything you just raise your arms like this: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

It's a gesture of indifference, the closest word to it is `shrug'.

closed as off-topic by AmE speaker, Lawrence, oerkelens, Bread, Michael Rybkin Jul 13 '18 at 15:44

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions on choosing an ideal word or phrase must include information on how it will be used in order to be answered. For help writing a good word or phrase request, see: About single word requests" – Lawrence, oerkelens, Michael Rybkin
  • "Please include the research you’ve done, or consider if your question suits our English Language Learners site better. Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic." – AmE speaker, Bread
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    It would help us if you include an example sentence showing how you want to use the phrase, and explain why "shrug" doesn't work for you. Also, are you open to phrases rather than single words? – 1006a Jul 13 '18 at 4:13
  • It seems our markup does bad things to the backlash in here ... ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ comes out as ¯_(ツ)_/¯ – GEdgar Jul 13 '18 at 12:13
  • I replaced the single backslash in my answer with a double backslash and that sorted it. – Bence Mélykúti Jul 13 '18 at 14:45
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    I don't know about you, but for me looking at this emoticon makes me think of the informal expression dunno: dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/dunno – Michael Rybkin Jul 13 '18 at 15:46
  • Please see this guidance from Stack Exchange management regarding Single word requests, crosswords, and the fight against mediocrity. – tchrist Aug 3 '18 at 3:51
3

I would say there is no verb other than "to shrug" to describe what you say. However, the word meh can be used as an interjection or adjective to convey this meaning:

"Where do you want to go for dinner?" "Meh."

  • Btw, it's "go for dinner". – Kris Jul 13 '18 at 9:00
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    There's nothing wrong with "go to dinner." In fact, I find it more natural-sounding. – Mike Harris Jul 13 '18 at 12:59
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It is officially called shrug or person shrugging. Emojipedia, the ultimate reference work in these questions, has this entry:

A person shrugging their shoulders to indicate a lack of knowledge about a particular topic, or a lack of care about the result of a situation.

Displays as raised shoulders, sometimes in conjunction with raised arms and flat hands. The shrug gesture in text (emoticon) form is known as the shruggie and typed as: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Person Shrugging was approved as part of Unicode 9.0 in 2016 under the name “Shrug” and added to Emoji 3.0 in 2016.

The Unicode documentation lists it here with the code U+1F937, and in addition to the CLDR Short Name person shrugging, it lists these Other Keywords: doubt | ignorance | indifference | person shrugging | shrug. (CLDR stands for Common Locale Data Repository.)

0

Clueless would be a good word for this reaction

  • Not really. It could also mean that you don't know how to exactly express whatever your emotion is. You can shrug your shoulders in many situations... – Oliver Mason Jul 13 '18 at 9:02
  • Welcome to EL&U. As a reminder, Stack Exchange is interested in definitive answers, those which answer a question completely, including appropriate examples and references. Your answer would be strengthened if you edit it to include demonstrative links, for example. The site tour and review the help center may offer further guidance. – choster Jul 13 '18 at 13:56
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I really don't mind or I couldn't care less :)

  • 1
    Welcome to EL&U. As a reminder, Stack Exchange is interested in definitive answers, those which answer a question completely, including appropriate examples and references. Your answer would be strengthened if you edit it to include demonstrative links, for example. The site tour and review the help center may offer further guidance. – choster Jul 13 '18 at 13:56

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