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I would like to understand the correct grammatical order in the sentence,

In your essay, you must use grammatically correct sentences with accurate spelling and punctuation in a style appropriate for the situation.

I hold the view that “style appropriate” is written bad because the grammatical order indicates that an adjective needs to be before the noun.

Is it grammatically correct?: NOUN + ADJECTIVE X

So,

In your essay, you must use grammatically correct sentences with accurate spelling and punctuation in an appropriate style for the situation .

It is true that it works like this ​ ADJECTIVE + NOUN ​

Resource: Cambridge English Objective First Book, Fourth Edition

  • "…because the grammatical order indicates that an adjective needs to be before the noun…" Says who? The man tired and exhausted, walked home. – Mari-Lou A Jul 4 '18 at 11:51
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    Your example is "reduced" from in a style which / that is appropriate for the situation. It's perfectly natural English, except I'd probably say ...a style appropriate to the situation / context. – FumbleFingers Jul 4 '18 at 11:59
  • There is no relevant difference, unless you can explain how “a style appropriate for” is different to “an appropriate style for”… When you can explain, that make more differene than most of us imagine and until you can, why would anyone care, please? – Robbie Goodwin Jul 5 '18 at 21:41
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"Style appropriate for the situation" is not incorrect and not badly written. The placement of multi-word adjective phrases doesn't always follow the same rules as the placement for single-word adjectives.

In English, adjective phrases that contain a prepositional phrase ("for the situation", in this case) aren't placed before the noun: we don't say things like "an appropriate for the situation style". (There may bee a few cases where this kind of construction is actually acceptable, but the general rule is as I have given it.) To avoid this, the entire adjective phrase is typically placed after the noun: "a style [appropriate for the situation]".

  • As well as that , What do you think about '' in a style that is appropriate for ….'' Could the expression ''that is '' be omitted – Alex Gerardo Arteaga Egoavil Jul 4 '18 at 11:50
  • @AlexGerardoArteagaEgoavil: that would also be fine. There's a term "whiz-deletion" that refers to the use of postpositive adjective phrases or similar phrases in contexts where a relative clause with an inflected form of the word "be" would also be grammatical. – sumelic Jul 4 '18 at 11:52
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It's correct because the adjective [style "appriopriate"] you used, is a postpositive adjective.

Sometimes an adjective does occur immediately after a noun.

In certain institutionalised expressions:

  1. the Governor General
  2. the Princess Royal
  3. times past

So note that we refer to these as Postpositive adjectives.

Postposition is obligatory when the adjective modifies a pronoun or noun:*

  1. style approriate [your example]
  2. something useful
  3. everyone present
  4. those responsible

Postpositive adjectives are commonly found together with superlative, attributive adjectives:

  1. the shortest route possible
  2. the worst conditions imaginable
  3. the best hotel available
  • As well as that , What do you think about '' in a style that is appropriate for ….'' Could the expression ''that is '' be omitted – Alex Gerardo Arteaga Egoavil Jul 4 '18 at 11:52
  • Yes, it could be in informal language. We ommit words for brevity. – Ahmed Jul 4 '18 at 11:54

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