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My heart was ripped, you sewed it with your thread of love.
And when you saw other ripped heart you asked me for your thread and unsewed my heart and left it ripped again, I saw you as a stitcher but I should have know you were a needleworker with only one thread and too many needles which you first use for stitching and then for pricking

This is a quotation written by me. Can I use ripped here? Let me know if there are other grammatical mistakes too.

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  • @kannE thanks 😊 please help me with grammar in after second line..can I write "when you see other ripped heart"? Jul 1, 2018 at 13:23

3 Answers 3

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"My heart was ripped, you sewed it with your thread of love"

Improving on that, you might consider:

- My heart's fabric was ripped apart and you stitched it back together.

- My heart was broken and you put it back together.

- My heart was torn apart or ripped apart and you put it back together.

I would not use; My heart was ripped, only.

Also, bear in mind that passives are not always the best choice as usually in poetry one is looking for the strongest effect:

  • You mended my torn-apart heart.

Even stronger:

- You mended my stricken heart

Cloth is ripped, paper is ripped with or without the word apart.

Generally, for an image involving the heart, we say a heart is broken but not that it is ripped. If you say ripped, you have to qualify the heart as being paper or fabric or some other material that can be ripped. Also ripped apart is stronger. It means the heart is now in two pieces, rather than one with small rip or tear in it. I prefer torn apart to ripped apart here.

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  • No problem, Mari-LouA. "We" are very liberal. [joke]
    – Lambie
    Jun 30, 2018 at 15:57
  • In the third line what should I use ripped or torn?? And thanks for answering 😊 Jul 1, 2018 at 13:20
  • @RichaMishra Ripped apart or torn apart.
    – Lambie
    Jul 1, 2018 at 15:28
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Without changing the essence of what you wrote, here are some grammatical suggestions:

My heart was ripped apart but you sewed it with your thread of love. And when you saw another’s ripped heart, you asked me for your thread back; the same thread you used to stitch my heart. You unsewed.my heart, leaving it ripped again. I had seen you as a stitcher but I should have known that instead, you were a needleworker, with only a little thread but lots of needles. You used one of those needles to first stitch my heart but later that same needle pricked my heart. Hope this helps.

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rip the heart out of (something) This idiom seems to fit what you seek and allows your sense of ripping. TFD

To remove, destroy, devastate, or totally undermine some essential or important aspect of something.

Grammar suggestions:

you saw other ripped heart(s) ..

you asked me for your thread, unsewed ...

I saw you as a stitcher. I should have known you were a needleworker with only one thread and too many needles which you use for stitching and then pricking (ripping)"

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  • So can I use torn here @Ibf Jun 30, 2018 at 15:33

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