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This view is based on his creation of the ascetic reasoner, Auguste Dupin, who solves a series of baffling crimes in five of Poe's short stories, the most famous being The Murders in the Rue Morgue in which the murderer turns out to be an orang-utan.

In the above sentence by David Stuart Davies, can anyone explain me how BEING is being used by the author.

Is it used as a gerund or participle? Please explain properly.

And how can we use adjective before BEING, and if we can use adjective before BEING then why?

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    this isn't a sentence - it has no subject (it should be 'the most famous case …') – JonMark Perry Jun 27 '18 at 12:44
  • @JonMarkPerry: It's a perfectly natural "sentence" in contexts such as Edgar Allan Poe wrote several early detective stories. The most famous being "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", in which [blah blah happens]. – FumbleFingers Jun 27 '18 at 15:05
  • The question only quotes part of the sentence. The complete sentence by David Stuart Davies: "This view is based on his creation of the ascetic reasoner, Auguste Dupin, who solves a series of baffling crimes in five of Poe's short stories, the most famous being The Murders in the Rue Morgue in which the murderer turns out to be an orang-utan." – MetaEd Jun 27 '18 at 15:58
  • "the most famous being The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is the same as "the most famous of which is The Murders in the Rue Morgue", for purposes of understanding the sentence. – Lambie Jun 27 '18 at 16:30
  • What is the function of "BEING" NO one has given a proper explanation . Please explain – Ahmed Jun 27 '18 at 16:34
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In your sentence, "the most famous" acts as a noun phrase. The head noun is omitted through ellipsis, or something like that. It means "the most famous [story involving Auguste Dupin]". The adjective "famous" has nothing to do with the following word "being"--we could use the word "famous" the same way in another context, e.g. "Poe wrote some short stories about a genius reasoner, Auguste Dupin. The most famous was The Murders in the Rue Morgue."

In "being The Murders in the Rue Morgue", the word "being" acts as a present participle that tells you that the most famous story involving Auguste Dupin was The Murders in the Rue Morgue. It does not function as a "gerund". Some sources that don't believe in a distinction between the gerund and the present participle would call this a "gerund-participle" form.

  • Is acting like a linking verb – Ahmed Jun 27 '18 at 19:44
  • @Ahmed: Yes, it is a linking verb. – sumelic Jun 27 '18 at 19:47
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Your sentence is not a proper sentence - the phrase 'the most famous' is referring to something - in this case novels by Edgar Allen Poe involving the detective Auguste Dupin, with his most famous of these being The Murders in the Rue Morgue.

Your question is treating being as a noun, a famous being, but as your sentence is not complete, this is a nonsense. So it's not a gerund.

The verb to be has many forms, this one is using the present participle to associate one concept with another, i.e. 'most famous novel by Edgar Allen Poe involving the detective Auguste Dupin' with 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue'.

Whether this counts as an adjective is debateable - I would suggest it is 'being' used as a verb tense, namely the present continuous.

  • I will post the full paragraph after some time then explain me properly – Ahmed Jun 27 '18 at 17:01
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If i'm not mistaken, your sentence is not complete. Before your lines, there must be a verb (predicate) there and from there why using "being" may make any sense

Gerund: gerund is used when the verb becomes the subject or object or while there is a verb after an adverb, ex:

As subj: swimming is my hobby As obj: my hobby is swimming Aftee adv: after swimming, i take a bath

Notice how i put the verbs? That's it

Participle (active participle): is the form of verb which acts as adj or such, ex

1) that running man is my friend 2) i need that man running this company 3) the man running the business is my father

Notice how i put the verb "running". I put it either after subject but before predicate or after object, not as the object nor subject. So, the word "being" is actually AN ACTIVE PARTICIPLE because it is put after the object but before the indirect object, that's as far as i'm concerned

And your question about how we put adjective before being is being itself is the adjective. If you want to use another adj before or after being, just makr sure it is put after the verb, using relative pronoun, or before the verb after subject

Thx

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I was told but not explained in school not to use "being" as a participle. How about, . . . "the most famous THE MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE"?

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