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I would like to use caveat to introduce a sentence where I specify important information. For example:

You can wash mostly anything in this washing machine. Caveat, if you wash wool set the temperature under 30 degrees Celsius.

You can drink from the bottles in the fridge. Caveat, put the cap back on the soda bottles.

Is that standard English or does it sound weird?

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    It sounds weird. :) – Lawrence Jun 27 '18 at 10:07
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    It would sound better if you replaced the comma with a colon. – Lawrence Jun 27 '18 at 10:07
  • It only really fits the first sentence. A caveat is something you need to look out for, such as making sure the temperature is correct. For the bottle cap it would be more normal to say Please put the cap back on the bottle. If you don't, there wouldn't be any consequences like your laundry shrinking. – Oliver Mason Jun 27 '18 at 10:25
  • @OliverMason actually I wrote "soda" bottles, because if you do not put the cap, the drink is not sparkling any more. So there is also a negative consequence. ;) – loved.by.Jesus Jun 27 '18 at 10:42
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    Caveatly, this is all anxietizing me. – Mitch Jun 27 '18 at 11:58
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Caveat is a countable noun and you need an article in front of it. That's why your phrasing sounds strange. With a bit of rewriting, however, you can still put caveat at the start of a sentence.

You can wash mostly anything in this washing machine. A caveat is that if you wash wool, set the temperature under 30 degrees Celsius.

If you are trying to use it as a kind of warning, a more traditional approach is to put it in the middle of a sentence—or to use something different.

You can wash mostly anything in this washing machine but with the caveat that if you wash wool, set the temperature under 30 degrees Celsius.

You can wash mostly anything in this washing machine.
Note: If you wash wool, set the temperature under 30 degrees Celsius.

(In the second example, both caution and warning can also be used, depending on severity and styling.)

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